SHARTQ'S

43403 posts / 0 new
Last post
Patch
Patch's picture

worth it?
http://www.cyclecomponents.com/19/sv/artiklar/pro-needlebearing-styrlager-silver-1-1_8.html

that's about 5 bucks. should i bother using it or will it crap up?

Fri, 02/27/2009 - 02:49
halbritt
halbritt's picture

Yes, and yes. The lockring can overlap the threads a bit and that headset is worth $7.20 if only just to be a spare.

...shift like jesus making one set of footprints in the sand in your time of need

Fri, 02/27/2009 - 03:30
Patch
Patch's picture

well it's silver and the one on my trucker is black. I was gonna get it to put in my trucker and put the trucker's in newbike. After newbike's bites the dust.

Fri, 02/27/2009 - 06:16
Petr5
Petr5's picture
(Reply to #404)

GoodEyeSniper wrote:
how about determining my chain size? That way if I see that it currently has 3/32 I'll know for sure, too. smiley

1/8 inch chains look really burly next to a 3/32. Just get a chain you know the size of and compare.

Sneaky Viking wrote:
"Your bike sucks and we have a team of biased experts to pseudo-scientifically test that hypothesis, all in blue shirts."

Fri, 02/27/2009 - 10:16
SUPERVEEPS
SUPERVEEPS's picture
(Reply to #405)

Scalawag wrote:
Cool. I'll read up. Another dumb one: AFAIK, and someone feel free to correct me on this, IRO chainrings are 1/8", no? Because I have an IRO crankset with a 3/32" cog. I feel as though I'd be better off running a 1/8" cog just for consistency's sake... is this a good idea or even going to make a difference?

IRO chainrings are 3/32"

And since you have a 3/32" cog I would just run that until they both wear out. The good news is you have the choice of 3/32"(stock IRO KMC Z, Sram PC-58) or 1/8"(KMC Kool, Sram PC-1) chains.

Fri, 02/27/2009 - 10:38
Wintage Townie
Wintage Townie's picture
(Reply to #406)

wotan wrote:
The brianforums diys by 165/pitboss on bottom brackets and headsets are pretty good with nice pictures and stuff (though, more often than not, I prefer to replace the bearings rather than re-use because I know I won't be doing this again for a while). Anyway, here's the links:
Bottom bracket
Headset

Yeah, those are nice DIY tutorials except for two things:
1. Retainer bearings suck. Fuck them, use looseball.
2. Just replace the damn things.

Sneaky Viking wrote:
when you look back at your life sometimes you see a set of hands on your keyboard and a set of paws, but sometimes there's only a set of paws and that's when Tarckbear was typing for you.

Fri, 02/27/2009 - 10:56
Scalawag
Scalawag's picture
(Reply to #407)

SuperVillain wrote:
Scalawag wrote:
Cool. I'll read up. Another dumb one: AFAIK, and someone feel free to correct me on this, IRO chainrings are 1/8", no? Because I have an IRO crankset with a 3/32" cog. I feel as though I'd be better off running a 1/8" cog just for consistency's sake... is this a good idea or even going to make a difference?

IRO chainrings are 3/32"

And since you have a 3/32" cog I would just run that until they both wear out. The good news is you have the choice of 3/32"(stock IRO KMC Z, Sram PC-58) or 1/8"(KMC Kool, Sram PC-1) chains.

I assume it would be a lot noisier to use a 1/8" chain? I wanna replace the one I have with a SRAM one and just needed to double check the size.

Fri, 02/27/2009 - 11:52
Scalawag
Scalawag's picture
Fri, 02/27/2009 - 12:01
CeeGee
CeeGee's picture
(Reply to #409)

GoodEyeSniper wrote:
How do I find out what size my fucking chain, cog, and chainring are? I think they're 3/32 but I have no clue, I googled the shit it says on my chain, but it came up with KMZ chains sold in both sizes, so that didn't help. The shitty stock cog and chainring don't say anything on them, either.

I really don't think any of the BD bikes other than the Kilo TT Pro comes with a 1/8 anything. Unless you've changed something it should all be 3/32. If you still want to check, go to the LBS like others have suggested.

Fri, 02/27/2009 - 12:14
Rusty Piton
Rusty Piton's picture

Patch, I'd forgo moving the headset that came stock on the trucker to anything but the trash bin.
If it's the Ritchy that I'm thinking about, it's one of the shittiest components I've ever had.

emor wrote:
Bicycle commuting is the worst way to get anywhere except for all the other ways.

Fri, 02/27/2009 - 12:30
hambeki
hambeki's picture
(Reply to #411)

Rusty Piton wrote:
Patch, I'd forgo moving the headset that came stock on the trucker to anything but the trash bin.
If it's the Ritchy that I'm thinking about, it's one of the shittiest components I've ever had.

Yeah, that headset is garbage. I swapped out an essentially brand new one for a CK a month or so after I bought my Surly because I've had horrible luck with the seals on the bottom bearings. I asked if it even had any trade value, the shop said "not really," and I threw it in the garbage.

MoonCat wrote:
All bikes are really just overpriced crosschecks with different geometries.

Fri, 02/27/2009 - 12:36
SUPERVEEPS
SUPERVEEPS's picture
(Reply to #412)

Scalawag wrote:
SuperVillain wrote:
Scalawag wrote:
Cool. I'll read up. Another dumb one: AFAIK, and someone feel free to correct me on this, IRO chainrings are 1/8", no? Because I have an IRO crankset with a 3/32" cog. I feel as though I'd be better off running a 1/8" cog just for consistency's sake... is this a good idea or even going to make a difference?

IRO chainrings are 3/32" And since you have a 3/32" cog I would just run that until they both wear out. The good news is you have the choice of 3/32"(stock IRO KMC Z, Sram PC-58) or 1/8"(KMC Kool, Sram PC-1) chains.

I assume it would be a lot noisier to use a 1/8" chain? I wanna replace the one I have with a SRAM one and just needed to double check the size.

Noise is caused by the shape of the cog teeth + the way the chain hits them (not to mention chain slack, chain line, lube, etc). Some cog/chain combos are noisier than others, and a combo that's noisy in 3/32" will be noisier in 1/8" simply because it's more metal coming in contact with more metal. A 1/8" chain on a 3/32" drivetrain might be noisier, but not necessarily any noisier than using a 3/32" chain. In my experience combos involving Sram chains tend to be quieter, especially with EAI and Surly cogs. The quietest chain I've ever used on an IRO cog was a Shimano 8-speed UG. Oddly enough I haven't yet used a Sram chain and IRO cog together.

Fri, 02/27/2009 - 21:07
Scalawag
Scalawag's picture

Thanks for the advice. I'm waiting to replace the chain till the spring but cleaned the shit out of my existing set-up today and it sounds so much better. Still, it'll be nice to start all fresh and clean.

Sat, 02/28/2009 - 02:52
Patch
Patch's picture
(Reply to #414)

crushkilldestroy wrote:
Rusty Piton wrote:
Patch, I'd forgo moving the headset that came stock on the trucker to anything but the trash bin.
If it's the Ritchy that I'm thinking about, it's one of the shittiest components I've ever had.

Yeah, that headset is garbage. I swapped out an essentially brand new one for a CK a month or so after I bought my Surly because I've had horrible luck with the seals on the bottom bearings. I asked if it even had any trade value, the shop said "not really," and I threw it in the garbage.

Dang, I don't wanna shell out for chris bling anytime soon, guess i'll be on the lookout for some cane creek shiit.

Sat, 02/28/2009 - 04:10
Scalawag
Scalawag's picture

Even the SRAM chains have the powerlink thing, you still need a chain tool to properly size the chain, correct? I don't see any way around that...

Sat, 02/28/2009 - 14:32
SUPERVEEPS
SUPERVEEPS's picture

Yup, but you can a cheap chain tool at walmart or target for like $3 if you're not ready to shell out for a Park or Pedros.

Sat, 02/28/2009 - 14:38
asterisk
asterisk's picture

Yeah. I usually tell people to buy the Park tool set that comes with a mini-chain tool. It works fine if you are just using it occasionally to resize 3/32" chains. And you'll have a nice set of tools to take with you if you don't already have some.

edit: This is the kit I was talking about, the Park PPM-3... apparently it's been replaced by some multitool thing.

Sat, 02/28/2009 - 14:45
Critical Jeff
Critical Jeff's picture

Why do old road frames have horizontal dropouts in the first place? I see no reason to adjust the for/aft position of the rear wheel. All the more modern frame is see all have vertical dropout, which make a lot more sense safety wise(no slipping)

Sun, 03/01/2009 - 14:20
GoodEyeSniper
GoodEyeSniper's picture

So you can do tite ficksie conversions, obviously.

Sun, 03/01/2009 - 14:26
Critical Jeff
Critical Jeff's picture
(Reply to #420)

GoodEyeSniper wrote:
So you can do tite ficksie conversions, obviously.

Damnit, i should have said 'inb4conversion'

Sun, 03/01/2009 - 14:31
CeeGee
CeeGee's picture

I appreciate the horizontal dropouts on my Bianchi. According to my life experiences, bikes were made with horizontal dropouts so that when your dumb roommate decides to mess with your wheels while you're sleeping and actually opens the quick release the wheel doesn't just fall out when you're riding. I rode that bike for at least 30 miles and nothing happened until I lifted it up to put it on the rack and the back wheel fell out.

Sun, 03/01/2009 - 14:34
Critical Jeff
Critical Jeff's picture

happy 1000'th post!

Sun, 03/01/2009 - 14:36
CeeGee
CeeGee's picture

crap! I noticed I was close last night and was like 'ok, Candice. Pace yourself. 1000 has to be epic' and I wasted it reliving how retarded my roomie is. I think this officially means that I need to turn the computer off

Sun, 03/01/2009 - 14:37
GoodEyeSniper
GoodEyeSniper's picture

Okay, I'm having trouble adjusting the saddle angle on my POS. Is it just cause it's a cheap seat post, or am I missing something?

I feel like it would be better if it angled up a little more in the front

When I loosen the bolt, I can adjust the angle, but whenever I tighten it, the clamps just put it back to the same exact position it's been in...

Sun, 03/01/2009 - 15:44
Blacksail
Blacksail's picture
(Reply to #425)

GoodEyeSniper wrote:
Okay, I'm having trouble adjusting the saddle angle on my POS. Is it just cause it's a cheap seat post, or am I missing something?

I feel like it would be better if it angled up a little more in the front

You just gotta be careful that the little teeth in the clamp are fully engaged with eachother.

Question: Are the decals on Kilo TT's underneath the clearcoat, or can they be take off?

Sun, 03/01/2009 - 16:21
mailer
mailer's picture
(Reply to #426)

Blacksail wrote:
Question: Are the decals on Kilo TT's underneath the clearcoat, or can they be take off?

under.

Sun, 03/01/2009 - 16:30
patrick
patrick's picture
(Reply to #427)

Blacksail wrote:

You just gotta be careful that the little teeth in the clamp are fully engaged with eachother.

this, and try pulling up on the nose of the saddle hella when you're tightening the bolt
It's probably the cheapo seatpost, mine is the stock one from the kilo tt and my turbo is angled either too high or too low, and it's impossible to get it in between

and yeah, the decals are under the clearcoat

Sun, 03/01/2009 - 16:34
Blacksail
Blacksail's picture
(Reply to #428)

patrick wrote:
Blacksail wrote:

You just gotta be careful that the little teeth in the clamp are fully engaged with eachother.

this, and try pulling up on the nose of the saddle hella when you're tightening the bolt
It's probably the cheapo seatpost, mine is the stock one from the kilo tt and my turbo is angled either too high or too low, and it's impossible to get it in between

and yeah, the decals are under the clearcoat

Man, bummer about the decals for my friend. He wants to gt the complete from bikesdirect, but I think that's gonna turn him off.

Sun, 03/01/2009 - 16:38
patrick
patrick's picture

Electrical tape on the black one! You can't even tell unless you're looking close or taking a pic with the flash. The decals are honestly the only thing I didn't like about this bike.

Sun, 03/01/2009 - 16:48
june
june's picture

what's the cheapest sealed bottom bracket compatible with sugino 75's? thanks.

Sun, 03/01/2009 - 22:56
TimArchyLime
TimArchyLime's picture
(Reply to #431)

Critical Jeff wrote:
Why do old road frames have horizontal dropouts in the first place? I see no reason to adjust the for/aft position of the rear wheel. All the more modern frame is see all have vertical dropout, which make a lot more sense safety wise(no slipping)

I've heard two reasons.
1) design theory dictated that it would be advantageous to be able to have a variable wheelbase on a bike.
2) older derailers didn't have the same ability as newer ones to keep the chain tensioned properly at the extreme ends of the gearing range. So to enable multiple cassettes to be used with the same chain, they had to be able to tension the chain slightly by moving the wheel.

I'm much more inclined to go with #2, but I really feel like it's a holdover from the previous era of single gear bikes. Up until the 90's, nearly every bike ever made always had at least semi-horizontil dropouts. I suppose there wasn't a big enough push to change until aluminum frames became popular, where any length of unsupported metal was in danger of being broken, thereby ruining the frame. Vertical dropouts solved this problem, along with replaceable der. hangers.

Snarky Varking wrote:
Tarckbike- Where mile 11 means you're on a long ride.

Mon, 03/02/2009 - 01:33
mailer
mailer's picture

carbon has gotten to the point where a cheap "generic" fork off nashbar/performance will be okay on my commuter/road bike set up. right?

Mon, 03/02/2009 - 03:45
Patch
Patch's picture
(Reply to #433)

june wrote:
what's the cheapest sealed bottom bracket compatible with sugino 75's? thanks.

there may be no stupid questions, but there are sad ones.

Mon, 03/02/2009 - 05:49
TimArchyLime
TimArchyLime's picture
(Reply to #434)

mailer wrote:
carbon has gotten to the point where a cheap "generic" fork off nashbar/performance will be okay on my commuter/road bike set up. right?

Yes. Just don't go for a carbon steer tube. The only thing that really makes them cheap is the weight penality of using cheaper carbon.

Snarky Varking wrote:
Tarckbike- Where mile 11 means you're on a long ride.

Mon, 03/02/2009 - 07:30
bward1028
(Reply to #435)

TimArchy wrote:
mailer wrote:
carbon has gotten to the point where a cheap "generic" fork off nashbar/performance will be okay on my commuter/road bike set up. right?

Yes. Just don't go for a carbon steer tube. The only thing that really makes them cheap is the weight penality of using cheaper carbon.

i've raced and crashed on these forks. best $80 fork around, or whatever they go for now.

Mon, 03/02/2009 - 09:59
halbritt
halbritt's picture

What's wrong with a carbon steerer other than the fact that you have to use an expanding wedge or an insert? They're also easier to crush by tightening the stem, but I would (and do) trust that a carbon steerer would be stronger than a bonded aluminum one.

...shift like jesus making one set of footprints in the sand in your time of need

Mon, 03/02/2009 - 11:23
mailer
mailer's picture
(Reply to #437)

bward1028 wrote:
TimArchy wrote:
mailer wrote:
carbon has gotten to the point where a cheap "generic" fork off nashbar/performance will be okay on my commuter/road bike set up. right?

Yes. Just don't go for a carbon steer tube. The only thing that really makes them cheap is the weight penality of using cheaper carbon.

i've raced and crashed on these forks. best $80 fork around, or whatever they go for now.

i'm looking at the performance forté so i can grab the fork/stem/headset combo.

Mon, 03/02/2009 - 12:21
june
june's picture
(Reply to #438)

bold wrote:
june wrote:
what's the cheapest sealed bottom bracket compatible with sugino 75's? thanks.

there may be no stupid questions, but there are sad ones.

well, i just wanted a suggestion. i wasn't sure because everyone seems to argue whether or not s75's take a jis or iso bb. i don't have the money for a regular s75 bottom bracket. thanks for your response though.

Mon, 03/02/2009 - 15:36
frankstoneline
frankstoneline's picture
(Reply to #439)

TimArchy wrote:
mailer wrote:
carbon has gotten to the point where a cheap "generic" fork off nashbar/performance will be okay on my commuter/road bike set up. right?

Yes. Just don't go for a carbon steer tube. The only thing that really makes them cheap is the weight penality of using cheaper carbon.

to clarify, he means cheaper carbon in the sense that it is heavier to obtain the same strength, not that the fork is weaker.

Mon, 03/02/2009 - 15:39
y
y's picture
(Reply to #440)

TimArchy wrote:
Critical Jeff wrote:
Why do old road frames have horizontal dropouts in the first place? I see no reason to adjust the for/aft position of the rear wheel. All the more modern frame is see all have vertical dropout, which make a lot more sense safety wise(no slipping)

I've heard two reasons.
1) design theory dictated that it would be advantageous to be able to have a variable wheelbase on a bike.
2) older derailers didn't have the same ability as newer ones to keep the chain tensioned properly at the extreme ends of the gearing range. So to enable multiple cassettes to be used with the same chain, they had to be able to tension the chain slightly by moving the wheel.

I'm much more inclined to go with #2, but I really feel like it's a holdover from the previous era of single gear bikes. Up until the 90's, nearly every bike ever made always had at least semi-horizontil dropouts. I suppose there wasn't a big enough push to change until aluminum frames became popular, where any length of unsupported metal was in danger of being broken, thereby ruining the frame. Vertical dropouts solved this problem, along with replaceable der. hangers.

Another reason is that standards for frame straightness weren't always as rigorous as they are today. Having adjustable dropouts meant the frame builder didn't have to worry about perfectly equal chainstay length.

Mon, 03/02/2009 - 21:52
kevinwulf
kevinwulf's picture

june wrote:
bold wrote:
june wrote:
what's the cheapest sealed bottom bracket compatible with sugino 75's? thanks.

there may be no stupid questions, but there are sad ones.

well, i just wanted a suggestion. i wasn't sure because everyone seems to argue whether or not s75's take a jis or iso bb. i don't have the money for a regular s75 bottom bracket. thanks for your response though.

They're ISO. You can use a Campy Centaur 111mm that will put your chainline out by 1mm, or the Miche Primato 110mmm which puts it out by .5mm. Or, supposedly you can use a shorter JIS tapered UN54, 107mm that gives a good chainline. To this, some say yea, some say nay. Here's one of the definitve brianforums threads with lots of Tarckers chiming in.

Tue, 03/03/2009 - 01:40
beargrinderrrrrr
beargrinderrrrrr's picture

not all information here is applicable to this question, but it's good to know, and for now it's the final word on square taper bbs: http://www.sheldonbrown.com/bbtaper.html

Tue, 03/03/2009 - 03:36
CeeGee
CeeGee's picture

So I got my girl a bike just before Christmas and we've been trying to ride together more and more as it gets warmer. She's been pretty insistent about riding with the seat post all the way down and its at least 2-3 inches too low. She has a lot of leg pain, all in the quads and knees, especially going up hills and is remarkably slow. I know its not fair to compare her to me but its just painfully slow and she's probably in better shape than I am (albeit not in better riding shape). I'm planning on lifting the seat post for her and letting her ride on the rollers until we get a comfortable fit, but is there anything other than the low post that I should look out for to make it a more comfortable ride. Its a Free Spirit, so its heavy as crap which probably makes climbing harder but should be a fairly comfortable starter bike.

Tue, 03/03/2009 - 12:32
dumpsterlife
dumpsterlife's picture

I got a rear wheel for free with a cassette body on it, is there any way to tell what size it is without putting on a 7/8/9?

Tue, 03/03/2009 - 13:21
hambeki
hambeki's picture

If there's a model # stamped on the hub, you could google it.

I'm sure there's a way to measure it, but I don't know what it would be.

MoonCat wrote:
All bikes are really just overpriced crosschecks with different geometries.

Tue, 03/03/2009 - 13:23
pirate
pirate's picture

I think that

7 speed= 126mm rear spacing
8/9/10 speed= 130mm rear spacing

But I'm not 100% on that.

Machines were mice and men were lions once upon a time, but now that its the opposite it's twice upon a time.

Tue, 03/03/2009 - 14:41
halbritt
halbritt's picture

130mm = 8/9/10

Look here: http://www.sheldonbrown.com/k7.html

More details. Check out the section on transplanting.

...shift like jesus making one set of footprints in the sand in your time of need

Tue, 03/03/2009 - 14:51
CeeGee
CeeGee's picture

What the hell is this?

Just changed chainring to the one that came stock on my Kilo. Tested the newly elongated chain and heard a horrible scraping sound as I rotated the pedals. It was this thing scraping the hell out of my seatstay. So pissed. I remember seeing it when I switched to the smaller chainring but didn't pay any attention to it until just now.

Tue, 03/03/2009 - 18:59
pirate
pirate's picture

Its a pin that is supposed to keep the chain from getting jammed inbetween the spider and the crankarm if the chain derails. it should be facing away from the frame and pointing to the crankarm

Machines were mice and men were lions once upon a time, but now that its the opposite it's twice upon a time.

Tue, 03/03/2009 - 19:12
CeeGee
CeeGee's picture

Hmm my chainring is definitely not on backwards. I actually checked before and after taking it off because that's what I suspected. I don't think I ever removed the original chainring until I got this new, smaller one and when I mounted the smaller one there were scrapes on the frame already in the same spot. So either BD shipped my bike with a backwards chainring and I didn't notice for two years or this pin is fucking with me. I'm so confused right now. I put the new chainring back on but something is up with the chain. There were some stuff links and I tried to get rid of most of them but when I spin the pedals I've still got something funky going on.

edit: I think there's just a lot of grit in the chain from riding the bike on ice and slush for 2 days. Can't clean it until I get back to Nashville. Thanks pirate.

Tue, 03/03/2009 - 19:49

Pages