SHARTQ'S

43764 posts / 0 new
Last post
patrick
patrick's picture

I think I'm too weak to adequately tighten my lockring. My cog will gradually loosen and then, usually when I'm climbing out of the saddle or something similar, I'll feel it tighten all at once. It's a lot easier to do the cog, I think it's mostly because the lockring is so thin and it's so easy for the wrench to slip off. Does anyone else have this problem? I'm scared to death that I'm going to strip the threads on my cheapo hub with all the screwing/unscrewing my cog is doing.

Fri, 02/20/2009 - 21:22
Cap-Cap
Cap-Cap's picture

it shouldnt take a hulkian amount of force to tighten. make sure the cog is completely tight before lockring goes on

Fri, 02/20/2009 - 21:23
Captain Gnarlock
Captain Gnarlock's picture

folding bead tires: how do you deal with the toob: in the tire before mounting, or slip it in when one side of tire is on?

also, why are folding more expensive, and why are they considered to be "better" than wire bead?

thanks, great Tarck.

Fri, 02/20/2009 - 21:30
Cap-Cap
Cap-Cap's picture

^hutch's?

i just let it sit, kinda mold it a little bit. get one side seated, then the other side

as for price, i dunno. better, i dont think they necessarily are, maybe lighter, but they are easier to transport

Fri, 02/20/2009 - 21:33
Captain Gnarlock
Captain Gnarlock's picture

Cap-Cap wrote:
^hutch's?

i just let it sit, kinda mold it a little bit. get one side seated, then the other side

as for price, i dunno. better, i dont think they necessarily are, maybe lighter, but they are easier to transport

yah, these are my first folders. i mounted one side and slipped the semi-inflated tube in. that seemed to work OK, but I can see how it would be easy for the tire to get seated poorly or pinched pretty easily.

re. better/more expensive, the Internet says so, so it must be true.

Fri, 02/20/2009 - 21:36
Cap-Cap
Cap-Cap's picture

just make sure you go around to make sure the tube/tire are seated properly

this should be done no matter if you have a folding/non-folding tire

Fri, 02/20/2009 - 21:38
y
y's picture

So this is going to sound stupid but I guess this is the place to ask. So, I feel like drinking blood but I can't seem to have misplaced my chalice when I moved. Will a glass work? a cup?

Fri, 02/20/2009 - 21:41
pirate
pirate's picture

Shimano trigger shifters: which ones would be compatible with a Shimano 600 8 speed rear derailleur? I'm slowly building a road bike with risers, and I realized that it would be kind of cool to have the shifters on the bars. I don't know anything at all about MTB parts.

Machines were mice and men were lions once upon a time, but now that its the opposite it's twice upon a time.

Fri, 02/20/2009 - 21:42
Captain Gnarlock
Captain Gnarlock's picture

jacques wrote:
So this is going to sound stupid but I guess this is the place to ask. So, I feel like drinking blood but I can't seem to have misplaced my chalice when I moved. Will a glass work? a cup?

i'd go with polyethylene, like a Nalgene bottle or something. Blood will stain bone china really badly (ironic, i know), so don't use a mug.

Fri, 02/20/2009 - 21:43
Larry Winget
Larry Winget's picture

kowloon wrote:
Cap-Cap wrote:
^hutch's?

i just let it sit, kinda mold it a little bit. get one side seated, then the other side

as for price, i dunno. better, i dont think they necessarily are, maybe lighter, but they are easier to transport

yah, these are my first folders. i mounted one side and slipped the semi-inflated tube in. that seemed to work OK, but I can see how it would be easy for the tire to get seated poorly or pinched pretty easily.

re. better/more expensive, the Internet says so, so it must be true.

I always put the semi-inflated tube in first.

I seem to always kill folding tires with sidewall cuts. I've had problems with beads separating too. I'm generally happy to sacrifice a little ride quality for shit that holds up a little longer.

The Pitbull of Personal Development®

Fri, 02/20/2009 - 23:00
halbritt
halbritt's picture

kowloon wrote:
Cap-Cap wrote:
^hutch's?

i just let it sit, kinda mold it a little bit. get one side seated, then the other side

as for price, i dunno. better, i dont think they necessarily are, maybe lighter, but they are easier to transport

yah, these are my first folders. i mounted one side and slipped the semi-inflated tube in. that seemed to work OK, but I can see how it would be easy for the tire to get seated poorly or pinched pretty easily.

re. better/more expensive, the Internet says so, so it must be true.

This is what I do. Folding tires have a kevlar bead and are generally quite a bit lighter than their steel bead counterparts.

pirate wrote:
Shimano trigger shifters: which ones would be compatible with a Shimano 600 8 speed rear derailleur? I'm slowly building a road bike with risers, and I realized that it would be kind of cool to have the shifters on the bars. I don't know anything at all about MTB parts.

An 8s Shimano mech should work with any 8/9/10 shifter.

Now for my dumb question. Does anyone know the service limits of Mavic rims? I'm wondering if any of you bike shop guys can look it up. My CXP33 has a visibly worn brake track and I'm starting to wonder if and when the rim will need to be replaced. I've got a micrometer to measure the wall thickness of the rim sidewall.

...shift like jesus making one set of footprints in the sand in your time of need

Sat, 02/21/2009 - 00:51
bexley
bexley's picture

How do you refer to this kind of chainring?

Sat, 02/21/2009 - 16:42
zombie

Kangaroo cranks.

Sat, 02/21/2009 - 16:53
bexley
bexley's picture

Hah. Yea, I tried a bike rigged with kangaroo cranks once. Talking about the chainring BCD/specification though.

Sat, 02/21/2009 - 17:06
kaido_k
kaido_k's picture

Installing an octalink DA crank: What specific tools do I need? Also anything to watch out for when installing?

I only have the tools and have worked on Hatta/Sugino square taper BBs smiley

Sat, 02/21/2009 - 17:58
pirate
pirate's picture

To install octalink cranks you don't need any special tools, just a 10mm allen or whatever tool you need for the bolts you have. Maybe a pin spanner if you have the self extracting bolts. The important thing is that you have the splines lined up. if they are a little bit off and you mash the crank down, bye bye cranks. I take the bolt and dustcover all the way out and push the crank onto the splines, checking to see that they are lined up, until they engage a little bit and then I put the bolt in and tighten it to spec.

What bb are you using? the DA octalink bb was probably the worst bike part I have ever used. I'm using a 105 now and I like it way more, even though its substantially heavier.

Machines were mice and men were lions once upon a time, but now that its the opposite it's twice upon a time.

Sat, 02/21/2009 - 18:08
kaido_k
kaido_k's picture

^Thanks pirate. I will definitely be careful on the splines.
I need to add to my question...
I meant tools for octalink BB install because I am taking out my Hatta (have all proper tools for these) and putting in the DA BB for octalink tarck cranks. What is wrong with the DA BB?

Sat, 02/21/2009 - 18:20
Rusty Piton
Rusty Piton's picture

I believe it's the same as the standard cartridge unit tool.

emor wrote:
Bicycle commuting is the worst way to get anywhere except for all the other ways.

Sat, 02/21/2009 - 18:26
everythinghuskie
everythinghuskie's picture

dura ace probably sucked because it was made to be so light, so the quality was compromised and the threads probably suck as well as who knows what else. like all dura ace parts. I have a track dura ace 7710 octalink bottom bracket though and I like it just fine.

this tool

KING OF SPAM. It's ok because I just made a profit off your anger.

Sat, 02/21/2009 - 18:29
everythinghuskie
everythinghuskie's picture

pirate wrote:
? the DA octalink bb was probably the worst bike part I have ever used. I'm using a 105 now and I like it way more, even though its substantially heavier.

road or track on the da?

KING OF SPAM. It's ok because I just made a profit off your anger.

Sat, 02/21/2009 - 18:31
kaido_k
kaido_k's picture

So I should get this?

I have this (the top one):

Interesting how it notes for this BB a 43.5mm chainline...

Sat, 02/21/2009 - 18:44
everythinghuskie
everythinghuskie's picture

actually I just took my cranks off my track bike and my dura ace track bb makes funny noises I dont like. I think im going to swap it for a 105 or ultegra road that can produce the same chainline sometime in the near future.

KING OF SPAM. It's ok because I just made a profit off your anger.

Sat, 02/21/2009 - 19:15
halbritt
halbritt's picture

The Octalink II DA cranks have a really, really poor reputation. There is a flaw in the bearing design IIRC.

...shift like jesus making one set of footprints in the sand in your time of need

Sat, 02/21/2009 - 19:48
everythinghuskie
everythinghuskie's picture

buzzkill

KING OF SPAM. It's ok because I just made a profit off your anger.

Sun, 02/22/2009 - 09:04
Endpoint
Endpoint's picture

There is NOT a flaw. Shimano made the different octalink Dura-ace bottom brackets for a reason.

The "track" one had steel cups to meet NJS standard. It is a sealed unit with normal amount of seal drag. The seal drag is a big reason that this is not the preferred system for track riders. Square taper dura-ace cranks or the use of a "hot-rodded" road bb if NJS is not a factor is the preferred equipment choice.

The "road" bb7700 has two sets of loose balls and one set of needle bearings. This unit was never intended to be run for any length of time without service. It was designed as a race level component. Many Dura-ace equipped bikes often would have an Ultegra bb installed at the factory for this reason. The seals on this unit are minimal and easily removed for improved performance when contamination is not an issue.

As far as the issue with spline failure, this is 100% the result of improper installation. I ALWAYS remove the self-extractors before mounting the cranks, hand press the arm onto the spline then tap lightly with a plastic head dead-blow hammer to partially secure them on the bottom bracket. Then tighten the bolts.

Never had an issue.

Sun, 02/22/2009 - 09:20
tya

patrick wrote:
I think I'm too weak to adequately tighten my lockring. My cog will gradually loosen and then, usually when I'm climbing out of the saddle or something similar, I'll feel it tighten all at once. It's a lot easier to do the cog, I think it's mostly because the lockring is so thin and it's so easy for the wrench to slip off. Does anyone else have this problem? I'm scared to death that I'm going to strip the threads on my cheapo hub with all the screwing/unscrewing my cog is doing.

Make sure your lockring is actually tightening down on the cog, not bottoming out on the threads. Some cogs are narrower than the cog thread on the hub, so when you tighten the lockring, it bottoms out on the lockring threads before actually touching the cog. The solution for this is a thin spacer under the cog.

Sun, 02/22/2009 - 09:39
Endpoint
Endpoint's picture

This is a common problem with lower quality stamped cogs. They are often .5-1.5mm thinner than a higher grade cog. The spacer trick only works sometimes. You are better off getting a better machined cog than continuing to risk stripping your hub.

Sun, 02/22/2009 - 10:17
tya

True.

Sun, 02/22/2009 - 10:29
patrick
patrick's picture

Is this likely to be the problem with an origin8 cog? I haven't really heard much about them, and I don't know how to tell these things, but it seems to be pretty good quality, and it was more expensive than dura ace and about the same price as surly. They didn't have any more surlys at the shop I bought it from, and dura ace doesn't go up to 17t and I really needed a cog.
I had the same problem with a formula cog, but it stopped for a good month or so after someone tightened everything for me, so I don't think this is what's happening.

Sun, 02/22/2009 - 11:29
Endpoint
Endpoint's picture

I have had good luck with the Origin8 cogs on a variety of hubs.

Never be afraid of over-tightening the cog when you install it. When we put cogs on at the shop I brace the wheel against the workbench and the floor so it can't roll forward and put as much weight onto the chainwhip as I can.

Sun, 02/22/2009 - 11:34
halbritt
halbritt's picture

bradencbc wrote:
The "road" bb7700 has two sets of loose balls and one set of needle bearings. This unit was never intended to be run for any length of time without service. It was designed as a race level component. Many Dura-ace equipped bikes often would have an Ultegra bb installed at the factory for this reason. The seals on this unit are minimal and easily removed for improved performance when contamination is not an issue.

This. Apparently, Fred didn't like to service his bottom bracket and as such, the BB7700 got a bad reputation.

...shift like jesus making one set of footprints in the sand in your time of need

Sun, 02/22/2009 - 14:54
pirate
pirate's picture

I serviced my 7700 bb frequently and it would always go out of adjustment within 3 weeks. it was really frustrating. maybe there was something else going on (I heard they are pretty sensitive to poorly faced bb shells) but i hated the thing.

Machines were mice and men were lions once upon a time, but now that its the opposite it's twice upon a time.

Sun, 02/22/2009 - 15:08
patrick
patrick's picture

bradencbc wrote:
I have had good luck with the Origin8 cogs on a variety of hubs.

Never be afraid of over-tightening the cog when you install it. When we put cogs on at the shop I brace the wheel against the workbench and the floor so it can't roll forward and put as much weight onto the chainwhip as I can.

Should I invest in a chainwhip? I don't own one, but I've been unsuccessful with both chainwhip and rotafix.

Sun, 02/22/2009 - 16:05
CeeGee
CeeGee's picture

I've always been able to get my cog on tighter using rotafix than with a chainwhip. I wrap a towel around my bb to keep from scratching the frame with the chain. Why not take it to a shop and either use their chainwhip or have them use one on the bike. If it makes a difference, buy your own.

Sun, 02/22/2009 - 16:52
everythinghuskie
everythinghuskie's picture

the track one i got from you braden is making some nasty noises, liek dirt or gravel got up in the bearings. the 10 yr old ultegra one in an older bike I have still makes no noise. opinion? get something different? or take it out and clean it every year.

KING OF SPAM. It's ok because I just made a profit off your anger.

Sun, 02/22/2009 - 17:35
Endpoint
Endpoint's picture

lollerskatez wrote:
the track one i got from you braden is making some nasty noises, liek dirt or gravel got up in the bearings. the 10 yr old ultegra one in an older bike I have still makes no noise. opinion? get something different? or take it out and clean it every year.

Dunno... sounds like something got in there though. Most likely just around the spindle though. Trying cleaning out around that area. I really doubt it's the bearings.

Sun, 02/22/2009 - 19:45
everythinghuskie
everythinghuskie's picture

air compressor time

KING OF SPAM. It's ok because I just made a profit off your anger.

Sun, 02/22/2009 - 20:07
Toast
Toast's picture

dumb q: is my fork bent?

my bike:

other 50cm kilos




i did hit the back of a car once or twice.. hmm

Sun, 02/22/2009 - 23:34
Toast
Toast's picture

also, jesus for that last saddle angle

Sun, 02/22/2009 - 23:34
everythinghuskie
everythinghuskie's picture

this is serious or a joke? im unsure

KING OF SPAM. It's ok because I just made a profit off your anger.

Mon, 02/23/2009 - 00:11
SUPERVEEPS
SUPERVEEPS's picture

Looks like it from here.

Look down the headtube on one side and see if the fork blade continues in a straight line, it should taper toward the middle (not back) of that line before the rake.

Mon, 02/23/2009 - 00:13
frankstoneline
frankstoneline's picture

looks like your shits fucked.

Mon, 02/23/2009 - 01:43
bloodbath
bloodbath's picture

dumb q: can i ride a cro-mo frame around raw with out it getting rusty? (i see a guy around riding a raw bareknuckle -- thats steel though) or should i clear coat it?

fuck it maybe i'll just get it powder coated

Mon, 02/23/2009 - 01:50
Petr5
Petr5's picture

chromoly is steel too. You'll want to put a clear coat over it.

Or get it anodized! hell yeah

Sneaky Viking wrote:
"Your bike sucks and we have a team of biased experts to pseudo-scientifically test that hypothesis, all in blue shirts."

Mon, 02/23/2009 - 01:53
CeeGee
CeeGee's picture

toast wrote:
i did hit the back of a car once or twice.. hmm

you might want to toss a brake on there then after getting a new fork?

Mon, 02/23/2009 - 01:57
Janderson
Janderson's picture

Yes, your fork is fucked. The same thing happened to a friend of mine's Kilo TT, but in the opposite direction:

Mon, 02/23/2009 - 02:06
Captain Gnarlock
Captain Gnarlock's picture

Petr5 wrote:
chromoly is steel too. ... Or get it anodized!

good luck with that.

Mon, 02/23/2009 - 02:09
Blacksail
Blacksail's picture

What does the tarckbear mean? I'm still new, fuck me.

Mon, 02/23/2009 - 02:17
Petr5
Petr5's picture

kowloon wrote:
Petr5 wrote:
chromoly is steel too. ... Or get it anodized!

good luck with that.

lol. it's late

Sneaky Viking wrote:
"Your bike sucks and we have a team of biased experts to pseudo-scientifically test that hypothesis, all in blue shirts."

Mon, 02/23/2009 - 02:19
Patch
Patch's picture

kowloon wrote:
Petr5 wrote:
chromoly is steel too. ... Or get it anodized!

good luck with that.

This.

Get that shit powdercoated. Or just coat the entire thing in linseed oil and hope for the best. Or don't give a fuck like that one rusty bike that looked awesome.

edit:
Weird bars and straps, but i love this bike.

Fuck that stem tho'

Mon, 02/23/2009 - 02:28

Pages