SHARTQ'S

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Petr5
Petr5's picture

gerund wrote:
So last night I changed the tires on the Centurion and I am pretty sure I put the treads on backwards. :facepalm:
Is this a very bad thing? Do I seriously have to do that shit all over again?

Ride it off road? If not, tread is mostly a marketing gimmick. You're fine.

Sneaky Viking wrote:
"Your bike sucks and we have a team of biased experts to pseudo-scientifically test that hypothesis, all in blue shirts."

Fri, 01/09/2009 - 13:50
gerund
gerund's picture

SWEET

Fri, 01/09/2009 - 13:52
Endpoint
Endpoint's picture

scrub wrote:
Would it be relatively OK to use a track cog without a lockring on the free wheel side of my flip flop hub on the Velodrome (just for riding some fun laps not competition)? Or is the freewheel side somewhat dished or anything?

And is it true that you shouldn't mix/match different brands of track cog for fear of damaging threads when switching cogs?

Cog on the freewheel side is fine.

It is true that certain cogs will have slightly different threading. I know Philwood suggest you use 1.375" x 24 tpi threaded cogs (phil, shimano, surly, some others). I recall the biggest issue was that most low grade stamped cogs use the other threading. As long as you are using something of decent quality and not switching back and forth between high grade and low grade you should not see any problems. Just stay away from those crappy stamped cogs and you should never have a problem.

Fri, 01/09/2009 - 13:54
CeeGee
CeeGee's picture

I feel like this is a completely different level of dumb for this thread but here goes. I don't know shit about brake pads. I've never changed any myself (barely use the brake on fixed and haven't had a road bike longer than 6 months) so I don't know what to look for to let me know they need to be changed. will they just look worn down? Do I need to do any kind of maintenance to my brakes and pads? Is there a science to replacing them/ it seems simple enough but would any brake pad be compatible with the different calipers that I have?

Tue, 01/13/2009 - 14:21
barba

CeeGee wrote:
I feel like this is a completely different level of dumb for this thread but here goes. I don't know shit about brake pads. I've never changed any myself (barely use the brake on fixed and haven't had a road bike longer than 6 months) so I don't know what to look for to let me know they need to be changed. will they just look worn down? Do I need to do any kind of maintenance to my brakes and pads? Is there a science to replacing them/ it seems simple enough but would any brake pad be compatible with the different calipers that I have?

Some pads have a wear indicator. I try to keep an eye on them, especially in the winter and spring when road grit can grind them down quickly. This may sound pointlessly obvious, but I replace them when I feel my braking performance has declined. They are cheap and a part I replace if I have a doubt.

Keep an eye on them to make sure that they are clean. If you get bits of metal and rock embedded in the rubber you can grind through a rim in a hurry.

You need to buy the right pad for your brakes. There are several styles. Which brakes do you have?

Tue, 01/13/2009 - 14:46
CeeGee
CeeGee's picture

^ Everything on my main road bike is shimano exage. Sadly I have no idea what's on my fixed since my parents took it to a shop and had a brake installed before I could get my hands on it and it seems to be unbranded. In other news, both calipers and pads are filthy. So I think I'll spend my afternoon learning more about them and cleaning them up.

Tue, 01/13/2009 - 15:24
hambeki
hambeki's picture

Man, I hate parents.

Both of those ought to take just plain old road pads. If you're really worried about getting the right thing, take a pad or two with you and match up the mounting when you get there. When it comes to brand/style, I dig my Kool Stop Salmons. It's all I ever buy.

MoonCat wrote:
All bikes are really just overpriced crosschecks with different geometries.

Tue, 01/13/2009 - 15:30
halbritt
halbritt's picture

Post up a photo of your existing brakes or check on the back of the caliper for the model, if it's a Shimano part, the model will be there. If your existing brakes take inserts, then just get new kool stops. If they're not ball & socket pad holders, or they don't take inserts, get the kool stop "dura" holder. Ball & socket pad holders allow you to adjust the angle of the brake pads which is very helpful.

...shift like jesus making one set of footprints in the sand in your time of need

Tue, 01/13/2009 - 16:26
Toast
Toast's picture

i fixed up my bottom bracket/cranks then was about to ride to school when i realized i (and an assisting friend) had put the thing together as left-hand drive

i was like, wtf? and was running out of time and grabbed a beater peugeot conversion.

my dumb question - does it matter? i think the cups were reversed (lockring on right, fixed cup on left), so the cranks were still on the appropriate side of the spindle.

or would it matter with the pedals? as i tried to ride off, i saw, oh shit these are backwards, then checked out the rest of the drivetrain and oops. i was just gonna swap left for right pedal, since that seemed like the fastest fix and i was in a crunch for time, but i was worried about them unthreading themselves or something.

Thu, 01/15/2009 - 03:05
Cap-Cap
Cap-Cap's picture

ive been drinking so maybe disregard, but pedals cannot be swapped from arm to arm, and in the same vein i dont think cups can be swapped from side to side

reverse threaded and all that shit

Thu, 01/15/2009 - 03:07
bmwdmb1
bmwdmb1's picture

Probably a really dumb question but is there any problems with running a 1/8" chain, 1/8" chain ring, and 3/32" cog?

Sun, 01/18/2009 - 16:33
zombie

bmwdmb1 wrote:
Probably a really dumb question but is there any problems with running a 1/8" chain, 1/8" chain ring, and 3/32" cog?

nope.

but coupling a chainline problem with a 1/8th chain and 3/32nd chainring almost got me run the fuck over and made me ted shred my way through a SIDI.

Sun, 01/18/2009 - 16:51
Cap-Cap
Cap-Cap's picture

rob roy has a 3/32 drivetrain with 1/8 chain. got brakes though

Sun, 01/18/2009 - 17:25
SUPERVEEPS
SUPERVEEPS's picture

toast wrote:
i fixed up my bottom bracket/cranks then was about to ride to school when i realized i (and an assisting friend) had put the thing together as left-hand drive

i was like, wtf? and was running out of time and grabbed a beater peugeot conversion.

my dumb question - does it matter? i think the cups were reversed (lockring on right, fixed cup on left), so the cranks were still on the appropriate side of the spindle.

or would it matter with the pedals? as i tried to ride off, i saw, oh shit these are backwards, then checked out the rest of the drivetrain and oops. i was just gonna swap left for right pedal, since that seemed like the fastest fix and i was in a crunch for time, but i was worried about them unthreading themselves or something.

If this is the case then your BB shell has just been re-tapped, and not in a good way. Unless it's pre-1980 French.

And don't switch the pedals around or those threads will get mangled too.

Mon, 01/19/2009 - 01:17
mr. fop
mr. fop's picture

is there any way to measure for good fit other than using seatube length? like front axle to center of the stem?

Mon, 01/19/2009 - 02:04
halbritt
halbritt's picture

Fit is outside the scope of this topic. That said, find a TT length that works for you. Pretty much everything else has a wide range of adjustment.

...shift like jesus making one set of footprints in the sand in your time of need

Mon, 01/19/2009 - 03:23
lofarkas
lofarkas's picture

Wow, halbritt comes through with the only sensible sizing advice I've ever heard.
Only trouble is, it's not much help to people who are mostly clueless about what frame will fit them.

Mon, 01/19/2009 - 05:16
mr. fop
mr. fop's picture

lot_22 wrote:
is there any way to measure for good fit other than using seatube length? like front axle to center of the stem?

i asked this question all fucked up.
i meant to make this question about vertical height... assuming that the top tube fits. i have one bike that is an ideal fit and was wondering if there was a simple measurement from the front that i could use when setting up or buying new frames.

Mon, 01/19/2009 - 12:02
halbritt
halbritt's picture

Saddle height for optimal pedaling efficiency should be the same for any kind of bike you're riding. Get your saddle height set properly, then measure saddle to bar drop with a level, or just estimate it.

...shift like jesus making one set of footprints in the sand in your time of need

Mon, 01/19/2009 - 13:41
Paramount
Paramount's picture

I am glad this topic exists cause I know this is a dumb question and I probably have more important things to worry about in the even of an earthquake, but still, I've been thinking about it -- I'm considering switching out my Topeak Dual Touch storage racks for wall mounted brackets. I have been happy with the Topeak racks but I keep thinking it would be toast in even a pretty modest earthquake because it is a tension rod system, and not actually screwed into the ceiling or floor. On the other hand, it has a lot of flex, unlike a wall mounted bracket, so maybe that would be good. Anybody have any thoughts?

Mon, 01/19/2009 - 19:07
Cult Classic
Cult Classic's picture

bmwdmb1 wrote:
Probably a really dumb question but is there any problems with running a 1/8" chain, 1/8" chain ring, and 3/32" cog?

The cog really isn't meant for a 1/8" chain so in theory yes it will work but it isn't ideal. You will see where the cog teeth aren't spaced out evenly in the chain teeth. Cogs are like $15 man just get an 1/8" cog if your chain and chainring are 1/8"

Mon, 01/19/2009 - 19:44
y
y's picture

What are chain teeth?

Good cogs aren't $15.

Mon, 01/19/2009 - 19:49
Cult Classic
Cult Classic's picture

I mean not teeth but the opposite of teeth, whatever that would be. And no good ones aren't but they are out there for around 15 bones.

Simply getting a new cog would be the best solution it seems.

Mon, 01/19/2009 - 19:52
CeeGee
CeeGee's picture

But as long as your chainline is spot on, it shouldn't really be an issue if you're running a smaller cog? At least that's what I've already understood. I've never done it because I just waited to upgrade my drivetrain all at once, but I know plenty of people who do it and haven't died yet. I think I'd rather run a good 3/32 cog than a crappy $15 1/8 one that's just going to destroy my hub.

Mon, 01/19/2009 - 19:54
Toast
Toast's picture

SuperVillain wrote:
toast wrote:
i fixed up my bottom bracket/cranks then was about to ride to school when i realized i (and an assisting friend) had put the thing together as left-hand drive

i was like, wtf? and was running out of time and grabbed a beater peugeot conversion.

my dumb question - does it matter? i think the cups were reversed (lockring on right, fixed cup on left), so the cranks were still on the appropriate side of the spindle.

or would it matter with the pedals? as i tried to ride off, i saw, oh shit these are backwards, then checked out the rest of the drivetrain and oops. i was just gonna swap left for right pedal, since that seemed like the fastest fix and i was in a crunch for time, but i was worried about them unthreading themselves or something.

If this is the case then your BB shell has just been re-tapped, and not in a good way. Unless it's pre-1980 French.

And don't switch the pedals around or those threads will get mangled too.

actually it wound up being the cups on the right side of the shell, only the cranks. silly us. nothin harmed, though, other than pride. thanks for the help, tarck

Mon, 01/19/2009 - 22:24
hambeki
hambeki's picture

Paramount wrote:
I am glad this topic exists cause I know this is a dumb question and I probably have more important things to worry about in the even of an earthquake, but still, I've been thinking about it -- I'm considering switching out my Topeak Dual Touch storage racks for wall mounted brackets. I have been happy with the Topeak racks but I keep thinking it would be toast in even a pretty modest earthquake because it is a tension rod system, and not actually screwed into the ceiling or floor. On the other hand, it has a lot of flex, unlike a wall mounted bracket, so maybe that would be good. Anybody have any thoughts?

Those racks certainly look badass, but I had a friend catch a broken rib from one when it fell on him while he was sleeping one night. Not many people can get bicycle related injuries while they're sleeping.

MoonCat wrote:
All bikes are really just overpriced crosschecks with different geometries.

Mon, 01/19/2009 - 23:31
Cap-Cap
Cap-Cap's picture

what caused the fall? im thinking about getting one of dem

Mon, 01/19/2009 - 23:32
curiousincident
curiousincident's picture

If I had to guess I'd say the rack was installed improperly, but who knows.

Mon, 01/19/2009 - 23:34
Cult Classic
Cult Classic's picture

Yeah I can't imagine an entire wall with bikes on it falling onto someone because it caved under the weight of two bicycles though.

Mon, 01/19/2009 - 23:52
curiousincident
curiousincident's picture

You haven't seen his friend's two bikes.

Mon, 01/19/2009 - 23:53
hambeki
hambeki's picture

He figured that dog was trying to get into his backpack, which was hanging off of one of the bottom hooks. He heard it run away right after it happened.

MoonCat wrote:
All bikes are really just overpriced crosschecks with different geometries.

Mon, 01/19/2009 - 23:56
Paramount
Paramount's picture

Bandwich- I have two of these and I am definitely going to get rid of the one in my bedroom, so if you want one I could sell it to you (I'm in Seattle too).

By the way, I have never had a problem with these. I got my first one about 4 years ago, then bough a second one. These are extremely easy to install and would not fall down in any normal circumstance. I've bumped into them numerous times, and they don't budge.

Tue, 01/20/2009 - 10:38
Cap-Cap
Cap-Cap's picture

how much you want for it?

Tue, 01/20/2009 - 10:44
lofarkas
lofarkas's picture

crushkilldestroy wrote:

Those racks certainly look badass, but I had a friend catch a broken rib from one when it fell on him while he was sleeping one night. Not many people can get bicycle related injuries while they're sleeping.

I have witnessed a guy fall asleep on the bike and ride into a ditch smiley

Tue, 01/20/2009 - 10:46
Paramount
Paramount's picture

Bandwitch wrote:
how much you want for it?

$60

Tue, 01/20/2009 - 14:58
Elderbear
Elderbear's picture

lofarkas wrote:
I have witnessed a guy fall asleep on the bike and ride into a ditch smiley

He musta been POOPED!

johnnyraja wrote:
This is the most pointless conversation ever had on a forum entirely devoted to pointless conversation.

Tue, 01/20/2009 - 15:00
Cap-Cap
Cap-Cap's picture

Paramount wrote:
Bandwitch wrote:
how much you want for it?

$60

pm'd

Tue, 01/20/2009 - 18:45
TimArchyLime
TimArchyLime's picture

Shelf brackets are the way to go if you can screw stuff into the wall. The ones with the hook for a closet rod on the end. They are super secure if you install them right, you can get them in different lengths so they hold the bike the perfect distance away from the wall, and you can put a shelf on them to hold all your shit. And they cost like $2 each. Just glue a little foam into the hook to protect the paint.

Snarky Varking wrote:
Tarckbike- Where mile 11 means you're on a long ride.

Wed, 01/21/2009 - 02:27
hambeki
hambeki's picture

That is a ridiculously good/easy idea. I feel stupid for not having thought of that before. I'm going to have to pass it on.

If you wanted something more durable and nicer looking than the foam, you could cut some 4-5 inch chunks of vinyl tubing and slide them on there. Or use some old bar tape.

MoonCat wrote:
All bikes are really just overpriced crosschecks with different geometries.

Wed, 01/21/2009 - 13:46
m4bandit
m4bandit's picture

TimArchy wrote:
Shelf brackets are the way to go if you can screw stuff into the wall. The ones with the hook for a closet rod on the end. They are super secure if you install them right, you can get them in different lengths so they hold the bike the perfect distance away from the wall, and you can put a shelf on them to hold all your shit. And they cost like $2 each. Just glue a little foam into the hook to protect the paint.

That would be dope but I doubt my top tube is even long enough to get to each stud. i'd have to mount them to a stud wide board and then mount it to the wall. Still a great idea.

Bud Light Lime - Flavor With a Twist!

Wed, 01/21/2009 - 15:21
halbritt
halbritt's picture

I'd use tool dip on the hook to protect the paint.

...shift like jesus making one set of footprints in the sand in your time of need

Wed, 01/21/2009 - 15:25
asterisk
asterisk's picture

It's actually a y-foil.

Wed, 01/21/2009 - 15:57
grantrules
grantrules's picture

Ok, building a polo bike out of a Specialized Sirrus.. If i'm doing a conversion and I want to use a 120mm hub in a 130mm spacing and the axle fits, I just need to get spacers, get a straight chainline, and redish the wheel, right? What do I use for spacers? Washers?

Wed, 01/21/2009 - 21:38
Cap-Cap
Cap-Cap's picture

axle spacers...

Wed, 01/21/2009 - 21:44
y
y's picture

Is the frame steel? If so, I'd just bend it. It'll put less stress on your axle. (I've already broken two this year playing polo)

If you're gonna use spacers, get some from a bike shop. They're dirt cheap (if they're not free) and will do a better job.

Wed, 01/21/2009 - 21:45
grantrules
grantrules's picture

The frame's AL so bending probably wouldn't be the best idea, eh?

Wed, 01/21/2009 - 23:12
asterisk
asterisk's picture

Not really. Grab some axle spacers at the LBS.

Wed, 01/21/2009 - 23:16
MissusTufnel
MissusTufnel's picture

Stupid sizing question...
halbritt said that TT length is the most important for sizing. I have a short torso and super long legs, so I adjust by raising my saddle. Do I need to get an extra long seatpost to compensate? How do I go about figuring this out?

Stupid skip stopping question...
I'm having a seriously rough time getting any kind of decent skip stop happening. Am I weak sauce or could I blame it on my highish gear ratio (52/17) and just keep at it until I adjust to it?

Stupid rust removal question...
I have a rusty old frame. How can I tell if it'll be worth it to get it professionally sandblasted? It'll suck if I pay to strip it and there's irreversible rust damage. Any way to tell ahead of time? I've hit it with chrome polish and rust removers already.

Wed, 02/04/2009 - 16:07
Captain Gnarlock
Captain Gnarlock's picture

i'll try some stupid answers.

1. Don't think you need an extra long seatpost. Most seatposts are plenty long, and I end up cutting a good six inches off, just to save weight. As long as you don't extend beyond the minimum insertion line, you'll be fine, unless you have, like, freakishly long legs.

B. It's your ratio. That's 80 GI!!!

iii. Phosphoric acid and sandpaper (edit: not at the same time). Sand til you get a good sense of how far the rust has gone, then determine whether sandblasting is worthwhile. Take to LBS or framebuilder for an educated opinion if necessary.

Wed, 02/04/2009 - 16:44
halbritt
halbritt's picture

MissusTufnel wrote:
Stupid sizing question...
halbritt said that TT length is the most important for sizing. I have a short torso and super long legs, so I adjust by raising my saddle. Do I need to get an extra long seatpost to compensate? How do I go about figuring this out?

Stupid skip stopping question...
I'm having a seriously rough time getting any kind of decent skip stop happening. Am I weak sauce or could I blame it on my highish gear ratio (52/17) and just keep at it until I adjust to it?

Stupid rust removal question...
I have a rusty old frame. How can I tell if it'll be worth it to get it professionally sandblasted? It'll suck if I pay to strip it and there's irreversible rust damage. Any way to tell ahead of time? I've hit it with chrome polish and rust removers already.

1. Don't ever rely on anything I've written. Mostly it's all bullshit. With that in mind, I bet your legs and your torso aren't that disproportionate. Raise the saddle if you need to, but I doubt you need a super-long seatpost as was already mentioned. Also, get a fitting.

2. Post some close-up photos for better advice. However, I'd suggest that irreversible rust damage is unlikely, particularly on the outside of the frame, unless there were some chemicals involved. Once the rust forms on the surface, generally it will protect the underlying steel from rusting any further and will remain structurally sound. If water or sludge is trapped inside the tubing, that could be an entirely different story. Hit it with a hammer, if it breaks, you know it was gone, otherwise, ride the hell out of your perfectly decent dented frame.

...shift like jesus making one set of footprints in the sand in your time of need

Wed, 02/04/2009 - 17:04

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