Bicycle Secrets

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Tail Hook Lengthener
Tail Hook Lengthener's picture
(Reply to #51)

VT regularbike wrote:
Still better than batrape chat. Haven't touched on that controversy in a while now. Cinelli cork anyone?

Use a heat gun or blow dryer to remove it.

BOOM! Full circle.

Sneaky Viking wrote:
when you look back at your life sometimes you see a set of hands on your keyboard and a set of paws, but sometimes there's only a set of paws and that's when Tarckbear was typing for you.

Thu, 07/03/2014 - 01:48
Shortpants
Shortpants's picture

I use cloth tape on everything. No grips. I'll never go back to rubber grips.

Thu, 07/03/2014 - 01:50
johnasavoia
johnasavoia's picture

Cloth tape over tightly wrapped old tube, a skinny one.

Thu, 07/03/2014 - 08:55
johnnyraja
johnnyraja's picture

Another vote for peaty's.

miguelaron wrote:
obese and unamerican
is your name Fat Albert Queda by any chance?

euclid wrote:
If you never open packages or slice fruit, is life really worth living?

Thu, 07/03/2014 - 09:47
teepz
teepz's picture
(Reply to #55)

imoscardotcom wrote:
i just use spit for grips, haha

gorss

Thu, 07/03/2014 - 17:26
curiousincident
curiousincident's picture

was waiting for that one

Fri, 07/04/2014 - 12:45
b-roll
b-roll's picture
(Reply to #57)

VT regularbike wrote:
Still better than batrape chat. Haven't touched on that controversy in a while now. Cinelli cork anyone?

"You know it's dumb. I know it's dumb. But fuck it, I still love it."

Fri, 07/04/2014 - 23:43
littletinyfish
littletinyfish's picture

Sometimes pedals aren't marked with L or R. Sometimes they're marked in weird places. Sometimes they are just poorly printed.

So here's a secret to stem the frustration: hash marks always indicate the left pedal. Sometimes there're a lot, or just a couple, or sometimes it's a ring around the spindle, but it always indicates left.

this was a big deal a hundred years ago when everything sucked balls ---match avatar

Sat, 07/12/2014 - 00:27
donks
donks's picture
(Reply to #59)

b-roll wrote:
VT regularbike wrote:
Still better than batrape chat. Haven't touched on that controversy in a while now. Cinelli cork anyone?

i really need to watch that movie again

Sat, 07/12/2014 - 04:33
E-ROCK
E-ROCK's picture
(Reply to #60)

littletinyfish wrote:

Sometimes pedals aren't marked with L or R. Sometimes they're marked in weird places. Sometimes they are just poorly printed.

So here's a secret to stem the frustration: hash marks always indicate the left pedal. Sometimes there're a lot, or just a couple, or sometimes it's a ring around the spindle, but it always indicates left.

You can also just look at the direction of the threads.

Sat, 07/12/2014 - 10:47
ryker

Yeah threads are the first and only thing I look at.

Sat, 07/12/2014 - 11:28
white folks
white folks's picture

yeah I have seen a couple really cheap stock throwaways with the wrong markings on them

distracted by ass pain

Sat, 07/12/2014 - 15:16
oogens
oogens's picture

Right side higher = right thread
Left higher = left thread

Sat, 07/12/2014 - 18:24
TimArchyLime
TimArchyLime's picture

^ That is some useful shit right there. Obvious, but just never thought of it before.

Anyone have a quick way to remember which side of an english BB is reverse threaded? I have to look it up every time.

Snarky Varking wrote:
Tarckbike- Where mile 11 means you're on a long ride.

Sat, 07/12/2014 - 19:20
Larry Winget
Larry Winget's picture

The drive side. The way I always think about it turn towards the rear axle = tighten and turn towards the front axle = loosen.

The Pitbull of Personal Development®

Sat, 07/12/2014 - 19:22
VT regularbike
VT regularbike's picture

Aka opposite of the pedals

Miguel wrote:
i mean as long as we're spending money, lets just set the wallet on fire ok

Sat, 07/12/2014 - 19:25
TimArchyLime
TimArchyLime's picture

opposite of pedals then. I can remember that.

Snarky Varking wrote:
Tarckbike- Where mile 11 means you're on a long ride.

Sat, 07/12/2014 - 19:25
jeffro
jeffro's picture

English BB threading is opposite of whatever the pedal threading on that side of the bike is. Maybe not helpful, but that's how I remember.

Edit: VT got them fast fingers.

Sat, 07/12/2014 - 19:29
Larry Winget
Larry Winget's picture

That too.

The Pitbull of Personal Development®

Sat, 07/12/2014 - 19:25
Shortpants
Shortpants's picture

Opposite of pedals is a great way to remember that. Damn. I wish I knew that reminder years ago.

Sat, 07/12/2014 - 20:01
NOVELTYNAME
NOVELTYNAME's picture

Oh no
Strip out a bb?

"Folks want options!"

Sat, 07/12/2014 - 22:28
mander
mander's picture

Ohh yeah

Ima combine the pedal hash mark with the bb-opposite-of-pedals idea and never forget how this shit goes again.

I don't swap pedals or bbs often enough to have commited this to memory before. This business about towards the front or back of the bike to either tighen or loosen something never seems to stick in my brain.

Sun, 07/13/2014 - 03:32
CheshireCat
CheshireCat's picture

Pervy mnemonic is tight in the front, loose in the caboose.

The threads go up and to the __x____
Means this is the ___x____ side pedal.

-is a cat
-is a REAL doctor!

Sun, 07/13/2014 - 06:40
anomaly

Back to grip chat, for non-lock on rubber grips a very small spray of WD-40 works the best. The grips will be stuck like glue to the bar within 10 minutes and only rotate once you get them super wet.

Sun, 07/13/2014 - 12:42
Larry Winget
Larry Winget's picture

Probably not news to most of you, but I use this all the time (No I did not learn it from Urban Velo).

http://urbanvelo.org/stem-clamp-penny-trick/

The Pitbull of Personal Development®

Sat, 07/19/2014 - 14:27
johnasavoia
johnasavoia's picture

Its such a useful trick. I have an old 3TTT quill stem that has a 2.5mm grub screw behind the main bolt which screws in to spread the clamp, really neat, not sure if it was something that a lot of high end stems did.

Sat, 07/19/2014 - 17:57
randsome beast
randsome beast's picture

At some point they started threading the lower or outside bolt hole so you could use a flat hard object to open the clamp. The grub screw is superfluous.

emor wrote:
RANDO LIFE IS LIFE ON THE EDGE

Sat, 07/19/2014 - 19:47
E-ROCK
E-ROCK's picture

Speaking of batrape, I just realized something that makes wrapping bars with cloth tape a lot easier. This might be obvious, but for starters don't remove all of the adhesive backing(duh) but THEN, because cloth tape rolls are hella long cut TWO small lengths to cover each of the brake lever/hood clamp things. Cloth tape loves to fold over itself and get stuck together and this enables you to keep your distance from the fold zone while still covering errthing. Does that make sense?

These things. Use two on each.

Mon, 08/04/2014 - 20:13
Tail Hook Lengthener
Tail Hook Lengthener's picture

The trick with handlebar tape is to start from the center of the roll and pull out, keeping the rest of the tape wrapped in the roll while you work. This method works best with gel tapes.

If you have to leave the tape mid-wrap job, there is only one tool to keep it in place.

Cutting the wrap is two pieces is nearly a must-do for wrapping Campagnolo Ergo shifter bodies, but it works well and provides a clean look for other bikes, as well.

Sneaky Viking wrote:
when you look back at your life sometimes you see a set of hands on your keyboard and a set of paws, but sometimes there's only a set of paws and that's when Tarckbear was typing for you.

Mon, 08/04/2014 - 20:35
euflavine
euflavine's picture
(Reply to #80)

bonechilling wrote:
Cutting the wrap is two pieces is nearly a must-do for wrapping Campagnolo Ergo shifter bodies, but it works well and provides a clean look for other bikes, as well.

Can you describe this more?

Tue, 08/05/2014 - 14:28
Personicus
Personicus's picture

Mountain Bike Bro Secret:

When snipping zip-ties, use a lighter to soften the remaining protrusion then use the butt of the lighter to smush / round the shape into something that won't leave you wounded.

Tue, 08/05/2014 - 14:52
ryker

I usually chop with nippers and grind flush with Dremel.

Tue, 08/05/2014 - 15:43
Lowrey'sOrgan
Lowrey'sOrgan's picture

Dremel with cutoff wheel also makes an awzm housing cutter

Tue, 08/05/2014 - 15:46
ergott
ergott's picture

Toe-nail clipper works perfectly. I also use end cutters. They make the cut flush.

If someone on here did it, I'd probably like it. Since it was done by someone I don't know, they're a fucking idiot.

Tue, 08/05/2014 - 16:58
jeffro
jeffro's picture
(Reply to #85)

Lowrey'sOrgan wrote:
Dremel with cutoff wheel also makes an awzm housing cutter

Fuck yeah it does. Plus sparks!

Tue, 08/05/2014 - 20:48
Lowrey'sOrgan
Lowrey'sOrgan's picture

forgot about this one until I recabled, housinged, and taped today, but different color housing for stoppers vs. danglers is great for helping remember which inline adjuster does what.

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 21:38
eric_ssucks
eric_ssucks's picture

Or you can use the 4mm linear housing for shitters and the 5mm coil for braks.

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 22:13
Lowrey'sOrgan
Lowrey'sOrgan's picture

well yeah. my eyes aren't as well calibrated as some.

Fri, 08/08/2014 - 22:15
imoscardotcom
imoscardotcom's picture

didn't really know where else to post this, but I noticed a super loud creak/squeak last night when downshifting the rear on my road bike, and couldn't for the life of me find out what is was during my ride.

Flipped 'er over when I got home and squirted some chain lube in the plastic bottom bracket cable guide groove for the rear shift cable, and creak gone. Didn't even know that could be a thing.

Fri, 09/05/2014 - 17:25
VT regularbike
VT regularbike's picture

oh yeah definitely a thing.

Miguel wrote:
i mean as long as we're spending money, lets just set the wallet on fire ok

Fri, 09/05/2014 - 21:40
Tail Hook Lengthener
Tail Hook Lengthener's picture

Definitely a thing. I often apply a thin coat of Shimano special grease when I'm recabling a bike. I also have like 5,000 plastic cable guides, and I switch them out often on really nasty bikes. New one, and lubed ones, definitely improve shifting.

Sneaky Viking wrote:
when you look back at your life sometimes you see a set of hands on your keyboard and a set of paws, but sometimes there's only a set of paws and that's when Tarckbear was typing for you.

Fri, 09/05/2014 - 22:43
VT regularbike
VT regularbike's picture

I either do that or run a little bit of like nokon or some other liner through the guide and use a syringe to inject some lube in before I put the cable through. Helps to keep some gunk outta there.

Miguel wrote:
i mean as long as we're spending money, lets just set the wallet on fire ok

Fri, 09/05/2014 - 23:27
emor
emor's picture

Would doing things like that help prevent the auto-shifting gentleman of substance experience while riding hard out of the saddle?

Asking for a friend.

"my main life goal is to have a dirtbag camper van with a bunch of bikes on it, go camping every vacation forever" -- me

Sat, 09/06/2014 - 10:14
dumpsterlife
dumpsterlife's picture
(Reply to #94)

imoscardotcom wrote:
didn't really know where else to post this, but I noticed a super loud creak/squeak last night when downshifting the rear on my road bike, and couldn't for the life of me find out what is was during my ride.

Flipped 'er over when I got home and squirted some chain lube in the plastic bottom bracket cable guide groove for the rear shift cable, and creak gone. Didn't even know that could be a thing.

MY FUCKING SAVIOR! BEEN GOING CRAZY FOR TWO WEEKS.

Sat, 09/06/2014 - 10:24
imoscardotcom
imoscardotcom's picture

lolol, awesome!

Sat, 09/06/2014 - 13:47
Larry Winget
Larry Winget's picture

A rubber mallet is a great thing to have around, not only for bikes but generally.

The Pitbull of Personal Development®

Sat, 09/06/2014 - 18:02
Shortpants
Shortpants's picture
(Reply to #97)

tarckeemoon wrote:
A rubber mallet is a great thing to have around, not only for bikes but generally.

Yep. Never had one, never thought I needed one. Then my friend moved in and he had one. Shit is so damn useful.

Sat, 09/06/2014 - 18:42
randsome beast
randsome beast's picture

Per the under BB cable guide; It is plastic and durable but being plastic it is a petroleum product. Not all lubes are beneficial to a knocked up sawed through surface that has lots of little cracks for it hide in. Environment and the type of weather you ride the bike in make a big difference. In my case lots of salt and road chemicals acting as drying agents.

So two objectives, not collecting abrasive particles and restoring the plastics low friction state. I start by removing the cables to fully degrease it. Followed by flushing the chemicals off and burnishing the cable paths. Then let a light lube soak in for a hour before being wiped dry. Finally I take a piece of clean cable with SP-41 and floss away under pressure fast enough to heat it up a little.

Excessive but effective.

emor wrote:
RANDO LIFE IS LIFE ON THE EDGE

Sat, 09/06/2014 - 18:57
asterisk
asterisk's picture

Million$$idea: Cable guides made from Delrin?

Sat, 09/06/2014 - 19:04
dorth
dorth's picture

lol i had that same problem/revelation about the cable guide squeak earlier this year so i dripped some lube in there and taped over it to keep it from getting gritty and gross. fast forward a few days, I'm riding in the rain - i get home and pick up my bike to bring it inside and it felt weirdly heavy. i set it down and a hear a "slosh" gave it a shook and realized it was full of water. pulled the tape off and it was pissing water for like 15mins. sorry mr.bike.

Sat, 09/06/2014 - 19:11

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