training thread

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aerobear
aerobear's picture

dmotobear wrote:
learn how to meter your effort and conserve energy. One of my teammates doesn't ride more than once a week and hangs in the 1/2/3 crits based on that skill alone.

for a crit you only really need 2 skills

1. wheelsucking
2. cornering

And if youre wheelsucking, the cornering is even easier. just gotta follow the same line as the guy in front of you and not jam on the brakes.

For Doug at Mt Tabor theres really no cornering to worry about. It's not really a crit so it's harder than that. And unlike most races where you pace yourself, it's a balls out uphill, recovery downhill kind of thing. Pacing yourself up the hill will get you dropped

What would be most helpful for you, Doug, is to identify teh other guys in the race at your level who are also struggling. Work with them instead of riding off teh back by yourself. Riding the rae in a group, even if off the main pack, feels way better and builds much more skill, plus you'll ride harder trying to push yourself and those guys. It's a mental game and once youre on your own off the back, its really hard to push yourself.

crowding wrote:
Every time i eat Dick's I just wind up disappointed that I'm not getting In-n-Out.

Sat, 06/11/2011 - 10:58
halbritt
halbritt's picture

dougtruck wrote:
i gotta do something.
i do not want to finish off the back in every race of this series.
what is a good workout plan for getting me to be up with the main group by the end of the series?

operation lose 15lbs has been greenlighted

Amy had some good strategy tips, but you want to improve fitness. Can you drop a bunch of weight quickly? Now is the time of the season to do VO2Max intervals and I have no great ideas about how to pace them without a power meter. You could try this: Find a hill which takes you 5-6 minutes to climb with an all-out effort. Time this fairly accurately. Then gird yourself for 6x5s. You're gonna puke. Climb the hill 6 times as hard as you can go without blowing up. Time your efforts and try to keep them consistent. Once you get to the top, roll to the bottom and spin for about 5 minutes then repeat.

Day 1: Race
Day 2: Rest
Day 3: VO2Max Intervals
Day 4: Recover, easy spinning
Day 5: VO2Max Intervals
Day 6: Recover, easy spinning
Day 7: Spin Easy for an hour with a couple of really hard 5 minute efforts thrown in. You could do a couple of your VO2Max intervals here, but no more.
Day 8: Race again

If you're doing this shit hard enough and can recover from it your fitness will improve very quickly. If you can sustain this for three weeks, take an easy week after with nothing but easy spinning in your fourth week with a very small dose of high intensity work.

...shift like jesus making one set of footprints in the sand in your time of need

Sat, 06/11/2011 - 15:14
dougtruck
dougtruck's picture

i think i'm just overreaching.
i was stressed so hard about upgrading and finals week that i rode myself into the ground and didnt sleep or eat right. i keep telling myself the suffering is good for me but the truth is my legs have felt like shit for about 3 weeks and i been pedaling squares for the last two. i'm gonna back off and just try and have fun again. for me riding is about seeing the sights and getting my head right
racing is less about competing than hangin with the homies
when i start comparing myself against other people fitness-wise for my self esteem, shit goes downhill.

so back to basics. keepin it fun, keepin it brown.

Sat, 06/11/2011 - 18:44
aerobear
aerobear's picture

my philosophy on eating is each as uch as you want, just try to eat good food. if youre feeling like you are overeating, just overeat on healthy shit. eating is super important to recovery.

i have very poor eating skills. i eat junk and i never make time to feed myself. but i try to make up for it at dinner every day and eat a huge filling of something healthy so i dont die.

plus i get real grumpy when hungry and no one wants to deal with me hangry. brent gets so mad cuz i get reallllly irrational.

crowding wrote:
Every time i eat Dick's I just wind up disappointed that I'm not getting In-n-Out.

Sat, 06/11/2011 - 19:17
halbritt
halbritt's picture

dougtruck wrote:
i think i'm just overreaching.
i was stressed so hard about upgrading and finals week that i rode myself into the ground and didnt sleep or eat right.

Adaptation doesn't occur from training, adaptation occurs from recovery from training. If you're not eating or sleeping right, then you're not recovering, so what's the point of training?

As far as eating goes, if you're interested in getting leaner, limit the periods when you consume carbs, especially simple ones, to those times just before or just after training.

...shift like jesus making one set of footprints in the sand in your time of need

Sun, 06/12/2011 - 16:55
dougtruck
dougtruck's picture

yeah ive been doing pretty much that, but on nights before races i would consume taters n pastas too
whatever, i've had a pretty good season on the road. got a couple top tens and made the 4s. learned a lot.
prob skip this weeks hilltop crit for the rapha ride
but ill do the rest of that series and then im done except for the kermesses and cross season
gonna eat bbq, work lots and have fun coz summer.

still gonna do track workouts with todd and the good squad, but racing track is gonna take some time.
i have the fear out there super bad :(

Sun, 06/12/2011 - 23:49
halbritt
halbritt's picture

Sounds like a good season to me.

...shift like jesus making one set of footprints in the sand in your time of need

Mon, 06/13/2011 - 00:48
aerobear
aerobear's picture

Brent has a wired PT converted for track use and an older cycleops cervo that came with. Can't download anything off of it into golden cheetah. Just says no serial devices found.

Heath???

crowding wrote:
Every time i eat Dick's I just wind up disappointed that I'm not getting In-n-Out.

Sun, 06/19/2011 - 22:33
halbritt
halbritt's picture

Well, can you get any data off it at all with the Cyclops software?

...shift like jesus making one set of footprints in the sand in your time of need

Wed, 06/22/2011 - 19:11
dmotobear
dmotobear's picture

update drivers?

Wed, 06/22/2011 - 19:19
aerobear
aerobear's picture

halbritt wrote:
Well, can you get any data off it at all with the Cyclops software?

I dont know if brent downloaded the power agant thing. Gonna try to get it and try that I guess?

dmotobear wrote:
update drivers?

Downloaded all the drivers it told us to and then some, still nothin'.

crowding wrote:
Every time i eat Dick's I just wind up disappointed that I'm not getting In-n-Out.

Thu, 06/23/2011 - 12:57
Bamfs01
Bamfs01's picture

aerobear wrote:
halbritt wrote:
Well, can you get any data off it at all with the Cyclops software?

I dont know if brent downloaded the power agant thing. Gonna try to get it and try that I guess?

dmotobear wrote:
update drivers?

Downloaded all the drivers it told us to and then some, still nothin'.

Does it have any firmware updates that may address the problem? I might be able to help or provide another brain (coz IT). Lemme know.

Thu, 06/23/2011 - 13:25
yonderboy
yonderboy's picture

Raising this thread from the dead.

This is a crosspost of stuff I typed into another forum, because I've done a post-mortem of my season and put together another annual training plan for 2018.

The book I started with about 10 years ago when I started racing was The Cyclist's Training Bible,by Joe Friel ( https://www.amazon.com/Cyclists-Training-Bible-Joe-Friel/dp/1934030201 ). If you've got a significant amount of time (~6 months) to devote to training, his periodization method is considered the standard for most cycling plans. I used this method for most of my amateur racing career, but I didn't really like noodling around in Z1 for most of the winter and didn't feel like I gained much benefit from it.

Last season, I decided late in the game that I was going to get back into racing and used Chris Carmichael's Time Crunched Cyclist plan ( https://www.amazon.com/Time-Crunched-Cyclist-Race-Winning-Fitness-Athlete/dp/1937715507/ ). The big thing I learned from the TCTP was that the bulk of my weekday training can be done on a trainer and done in around an hour. That plan was able to get me to a pretty good level of fitness in a short time. The downside is that the TCTP has a really short peak of maybe a week or two and you really need to pay attention to the signs of overtraining. That plan runs for 12 weeks without rest, but I found I could only make it about 10 before I started noticing fatigue setting in. That said, I was able to put in one of my best seasons to date with the help of this plan.

Sometime last year, I was introduced to the British Cycling training plans, which they provide for free ( https://www.britishcycling.org.uk/knowledge/training-plans ). They were published about 2 years ago, but I've heard good things about them. This year I've based my overall plan on the British Cycling plans, because the mid-week workouts are largely trainer-based and they have a little more intensity in the early season than the traditional periodization plan. The Foundation plan has rides on the weekends that are 3+ hrs long, which I'm not sure I can swing in the winter. I'm going to keep doing the trainer workouts during the week and possibly use some of the longer intervals from the TCTP to supplement my weekend riding if the roads are shitty. The other nice thing about these plans is that there are discipline-specific 8-week plans that can be applied during a racing season after following the Foundation and build schedules.

The thing that sucks about annual training plans is that it usually takes a few months to usually figure out if they're headed in the right direction. I spent a couple weeks considering a coach, but I'd be looking at ~$150 for a consultation and training plan, with a monthly fee for plan maintenance to tweak the schedule.

In the end, I decided I would save myself some money and just keyed the BC plans into Google Calendar while I was reviewing them. I think the British Cycling plans are actually free on TrainingPeaks, but I like having the weekly agenda on my phone.

Right now, most of the 2018 schedules have not been published. My overall plan is to following the BC Foundation and Build plans for now and revisit my plan in February to pick out my A races. I'm tentatively planning to race enduro MTB on the weekends and hit up the weekday track races. I'd really like to travel to Sweden for an enduro, but I may have to limit my travel to Montana or Northern Washington, depending on cash flow.

Sun, 11/12/2017 - 13:47
NOVELTYNAME
NOVELTYNAME's picture

I am interested

"Folks want options!"

Sun, 11/12/2017 - 15:06
cousinmosquito
cousinmosquito's picture
(Reply to #315)

Time crunched is the ONLY way to train. Most people spend too long doing their hard rides to easy and their easy rides too hard. When I trained as opposed to just riding I already had a family so I had to get really inventive with my time. If you really want to do something you will find a way. I was lucky enough to have a big office to myself, and out the back, there was a large switch board room. I hid a windtrainer and a mattresse in it. Until the office manager found, which was quite a while later. I could do sessions out the back in my lunch hour if the weather was arse and if I was tired from having a life, I could grab a 30 minute micro-nap at lunch in the dark on the mattress. One of my daughters had a 30 minute dance class. I would take her inside to the class, take my bike of the car rack and do a 20 minute hill climb behind the dance studio that had a 5 minute descent. 20 minutes effort is good value training. If you've read all the Friel and Carmichael stuff you probably don't need a coach. Most people pay good money for coaches and ignore what they say anyway. Sounds like you have some cool stuff coming up.

More wonderful than you can believe it

Mon, 11/13/2017 - 03:11
y
y's picture
(Reply to #316)

yonderboy wrote:
Raising this thread from the dead.

This is a crosspost of stuff I typed into another forum, because I've done a post-mortem of my season and put together another annual training plan for 2018.

The book I started with about 10 years ago when I started racing was The Cyclist's Training Bible,by Joe Friel ( https://www.amazon.com/Cyclists-Training-Bible-Joe-Friel/dp/1934030201 ). If you've got a significant amount of time (~6 months) to devote to training, his periodization method is considered the standard for most cycling plans. I used this method for most of my amateur racing career, but I didn't really like noodling around in Z1 for most of the winter and didn't feel like I gained much benefit from it.

Last season, I decided late in the game that I was going to get back into racing and used Chris Carmichael's Time Crunched Cyclist plan ( https://www.amazon.com/Time-Crunched-Cyclist-Race-Winning-Fitness-Athlete/dp/1937715507/ ). The big thing I learned from the TCTP was that the bulk of my weekday training can be done on a trainer and done in around an hour. That plan was able to get me to a pretty good level of fitness in a short time. The downside is that the TCTP has a really short peak of maybe a week or two and you really need to pay attention to the signs of overtraining. That plan runs for 12 weeks without rest, but I found I could only make it about 10 before I started noticing fatigue setting in. That said, I was able to put in one of my best seasons to date with the help of this plan.

Sometime last year, I was introduced to the British Cycling training plans, which they provide for free ( https://www.britishcycling.org.uk/knowledge/training-plans ). They were published about 2 years ago, but I've heard good things about them. This year I've based my overall plan on the British Cycling plans, because the mid-week workouts are largely trainer-based and they have a little more intensity in the early season than the traditional periodization plan. The Foundation plan has rides on the weekends that are 3+ hrs long, which I'm not sure I can swing in the winter. I'm going to keep doing the trainer workouts during the week and possibly use some of the longer intervals from the TCTP to supplement my weekend riding if the roads are shitty. The other nice thing about these plans is that there are discipline-specific 8-week plans that can be applied during a racing season after following the Foundation and build schedules.

The thing that sucks about annual training plans is that it usually takes a few months to usually figure out if they're headed in the right direction. I spent a couple weeks considering a coach, but I'd be looking at ~$150 for a consultation and training plan, with a monthly fee for plan maintenance to tweak the schedule.

In the end, I decided I would save myself some money and just keyed the BC plans into Google Calendar while I was reviewing them. I think the British Cycling plans are actually free on TrainingPeaks, but I like having the weekly agenda on my phone.

Right now, most of the 2018 schedules have not been published. My overall plan is to following the BC Foundation and Build plans for now and revisit my plan in February to pick out my A races. I'm tentatively planning to race enduro MTB on the weekends and hit up the weekday track races. I'd really like to travel to Sweden for an enduro, but I may have to limit my travel to Montana or Northern Washington, depending on cash flow.

how many hours/week you training? what category(ies) you race in? what's yr ftp/kg?

Mon, 11/13/2017 - 05:57
yonderboy
yonderboy's picture
(Reply to #317)

y wrote:
how many hours/week you training? what category(ies) you race in? what's yr ftp/kg?

One nice thing I've found about using software is that all that stuff has been logged for me without having to think about it.

I averaged 6.15 hrs/wk at 330 TSS; I'm planning on upping that to 7 hrs/wk at around 370 TSS.

My w/kg on the Stages should be about 2.65, but I need to retest. That puts me fairly low on Coggan's chart, but I'm only putting down 1s maxes of 800 w. I suspect I've got an imbalance going on, but as long as I keep re-testing at regular intervals, I can work with that. I'll probably stick with Sport on the MTB and Cat 4 on the track. I actually placed reasonably well in both those categories last season, so I might be able to upgrade for the first time in forever.

Which reminds me: Now that Coggan and PeaksWare have had a falling out, what arbitrary measurement are amateurs going to use to measure their virility online with?

Mon, 11/13/2017 - 09:31
eric_ssucks
eric_ssucks's picture

Strava.

Mon, 11/13/2017 - 17:54
y
y's picture

i'm gonna do trainer road again and substitute all the workouts with track and outdoor rides.

Mon, 11/13/2017 - 18:27
aerobear
aerobear's picture

i don't care about ftp anymore (used to be around 4 w/kg peak season).
back in the gym doing squads, deadlifts, etc. trying to focus on strength and mtb skills. gonna nail the technical riding this year.

and dirt jumps, cuz why not.

crowding wrote:
Every time i eat Dick's I just wind up disappointed that I'm not getting In-n-Out.

Mon, 11/13/2017 - 23:13
NOVELTYNAME
NOVELTYNAME's picture

I want to be as fast as I was in 2015. I need to ride but I’m very uncomfortable right now. My rain gear sucks and my gloves suck so here I am.

Tonight I got some nikwax tech wash to do my jacket and pants and I guess I’ll go from there. Next are pogies and shoe covers.

"Folks want options!"

Tue, 11/14/2017 - 01:21
littletinyfish
littletinyfish's picture

Started training for the first time (PerfPro). I'm on one day a week and am working through the bumps.

Week 1: Wrong FTP (240) totally destroyed me by the end.
Week 2: Correct FTP (212) felt too easy while I was doing it, but afterwards felt pretty cooked, so maybe it just felt easy by comparison. It was supposed to be a 74% effort, so maybe it's all good now. I'm tempted to raise my FTP by a few points anyway.

It's difficult to keep up with this kind of workout with my diet. I have to eat way more calories than I'm used to and I'm still not good at it. This was a problem during regular cross season as well.

My saddle seems to shapeshift on me between riding on the road and riding on the trainer. By the end of my training run my sit bones were so sore. Is this a thing? Do I need to switch to a training saddle? What might cause this to happen?

this was a big deal a hundred years ago when everything sucked balls ---match avatar

Sat, 01/13/2018 - 12:53
cousinmosquito
cousinmosquito's picture

Possibly just because when you are on the trainer you don't move around as much as you do on the road, a bit like being a stoker on a tandem. Just stand up a bit every now and then. Any little change in gradient on the road causes you to make minute adjustments to your position. A comfy saddle might make sense if it's a trainer only bike.

More wonderful than you can believe it

Sat, 01/13/2018 - 15:04
aerobear
aerobear's picture

that is definitely a thing. most people dont get out of the saddle or change positions, so you are just smashing all your weight into your sit bones all day.
i would work on standing up intermittently and changing hand positions so that your weight distribution moves around.

74% effort definitely shouldn't feel hard while youre doing it. should be more mental, but then fatigued at the end.

if this is your first time getting into structured training, you'll probably see your FTP go up pretty quickly. i would do a few more workouts before you change it though. it's a good idea to adjust it every 4-6 weeks to start, then if you keep it up, you'll have a better feel for doing adjustments without necessarily retesting.

i am currently trying to gain weight and its so godamn hard for me. i rode both days last weekend and two longer lunch rides this week and i'm down 5lbs from before last weekend. wtf.
eating as much as i can at every meal, snacking all day at work.. but as soon as i put it hours on the bike, i lose it all.

crowding wrote:
Every time i eat Dick's I just wind up disappointed that I'm not getting In-n-Out.

Sat, 01/13/2018 - 16:49
cousinmosquito
cousinmosquito's picture
(Reply to #325)

aerobear wrote:
that is definitely a thing. most people dont get out of the saddle or change positions, so you are just smashing all your weight into your sit bones all day.
i would work on standing up intermittently and changing hand positions so that your weight distribution moves around.

74% effort definitely shouldn't feel hard while youre doing it. should be more mental, but then fatigued at the end.

if this is your first time getting into structured training, you'll probably see your FTP go up pretty quickly. i would do a few more workouts before you change it though. it's a good idea to adjust it every 4-6 weeks to start, then if you keep it up, you'll have a better feel for doing adjustments without necessarily retesting.

i am currently trying to gain weight and its so godamn hard for me. i rode both days last weekend and two longer lunch rides this week and i'm down 5lbs from before last weekend. wtf.
eating as much as i can at every meal, snacking all day at work.. but as soon as i put it hours on the bike, i lose it all.

I went through a phase like that. I supplemented heavily with beer and icecream, ended up getting gout! I was also probably the fittest I'd ever been relative to my age.

More wonderful than you can believe it

Sat, 01/13/2018 - 16:56
aerobear
aerobear's picture

Luckily I'm a vegan, so pretty sure I don't have to worry about gout...

crowding wrote:
Every time i eat Dick's I just wind up disappointed that I'm not getting In-n-Out.

Sat, 01/13/2018 - 17:22
cousinmosquito
cousinmosquito's picture
(Reply to #327)

littletinyfish wrote:
Started training for the first time (PerfPro). I'm on one day a week and am working through the bumps.

Week 1: Wrong FTP (240) totally destroyed me by the end.
Week 2: Correct FTP (212) felt too easy while I was doing it, but afterwards felt pretty cooked, so maybe it just felt easy by comparison. It was supposed to be a 74% effort, so maybe it's all good now. I'm tempted to raise my FTP by a few points anyway.

It's difficult to keep up with this kind of workout with my diet. I have to eat way more calories than I'm used to and I'm still not good at it. This was a problem during regular cross season as well.

My saddle seems to shapeshift on me between riding on the road and riding on the trainer. By the end of my training run my sit bones were so sore. Is this a thing? Do I need to switch to a training saddle? What might cause this to happen?

How are you coming up with your FTP number ? I used to find it much easier to do that shit in the field, rather than on a wind trainer. Or even in a race, preferably a TT. Doing it inside just messes with your head. I understand you may have weather constraints.

More wonderful than you can believe it

Sat, 01/13/2018 - 20:26
halbritt
halbritt's picture

Changed the name of the thread so I don't feel obligated to comment on everything.

Became tired of following Coggan pissing matches with the world around him, basically.

...shift like jesus making one set of footprints in the sand in your time of need

Sun, 01/14/2018 - 13:46
littletinyfish
littletinyfish's picture
(Reply to #329)

cousinmosquito wrote:
How are you coming up with your FTP number ? I used to find it much easier to do that shit in the field, rather than on a wind trainer. Or even in a race, preferably a TT. Doing it inside just messes with your head. I understand you may have weather constraints.

I did one FTP test in December. The 240 was a mistake cuz that was the default when I did the test, and it was never updated. Since it was my first time, the numbers were meaningless to me, and so I didn't notice (until halfway through the ride when I was totally gassed).

I don't have a power meter (yet?) and training has never really interested me, but the opportunity presented itself, so here I am, figuring it out as I go.

this was a big deal a hundred years ago when everything sucked balls ---match avatar

Sun, 01/14/2018 - 14:01
yonderboy
yonderboy's picture

Has anyone looked at/used Xert? It seems like it's big thing is that it uses an estimate of your FTP based on previous efforts, rather than through testing.

I'm not sure what to think about the planner function. The suggestion feature is kinda neat, but I like to know at least what my week of training is going to look like. The plans are supposedly 120-days out from your target event. I might fool around with this during the next off-season.

Mon, 01/22/2018 - 09:18
NOVELTYNAME
NOVELTYNAME's picture

Regarding HR zones: the gist of it is that there are five (sometimes seven but let's stick to five) HR zones. The zones are determined in relation to your Maximum Heart Rate (MHR). The easiest - and most likely incorrect - way to determine one's MHR is to subtract one's age from the number 220. Based on this calculation my MHR should be 164 bpm whereas my lab tested max is 174 bpm. You can get the accurate MHR by either going to a sports lab and do a stress test (where they will measure not only your MHR but also your threshold HR and your FTP in bpm and watts) or by doing this fairly unpleasant exercise: pick a section of road (minimum five minutes' ride long – a hill is best) and start off at an intensity you think you can just about hold until the end. Every minute accelerate and ride a little bit harder until you are right at your limit, then try and sprint for as long as your legs will allow. Record your maximum heart rate.

Once you determine your MHR, you can calculate your training/output zones. You will find that Strava uses a slightly different calculation of zones. I think the following one is a little better:
Zone one – active recovery
(<55% FTP power / <68% threshold HR / 50-60% MHR)
Training at this intensity means you can stay active without becoming fatigued. After training hard your body will often go in to shut down mode to try and recover as quickly as possible. This, however, leaves you feeling sluggish. Training in zone one will allow you to keep your legs turning over without adding to your levels of fatigue.

When to ride in zone one
Perfect for when you need to recover form a hard session but don’t want to feel sluggish the next day.

Zone two – endurance
(55-75% FTP power / 68-83% threshold HR / 60-70% MHR)
Riding in zone two teaches your body to burn fat as a fuel source and encourages your body to produce more mitochondria. The very top of zone two is your aerobic threshold. Therefore in zone two your blood lactate shouldn’t be elevated.

When to ride in zone two
To work on your base fitness. Sessions in zone two can typically last up to six or seven hours for pro cyclists but you don’t need to ride for that long to feel the benefit.

Zone three – tempo
(76-90% FTP / 84-94% threshold HR / 70-80% MHR)
This zone works on your ability to hold a consistent high pace. When in zone three you will be riding in when riding hard but comfortably. Most people really enjoy zone three training as they feel they are riding quickly without riding too hard. Training in zone three has a lot of the advantages of zone two, however it’s a lot more tiring. Therefore, the number of sessions that can be completed in a row, or the length of each individual session, needs to be limited. The biggest reason for riding in zone three is that it stimulates your body to increase the amount of glycogen it can store (in zone three glycogen usage is starting to overtake fat usage as the primary fuel source).

When to ride in zone three
Often periods of zone three are included in a predominately zone two ride. This way a rider can earn the benefits of zone three training without the accompanied fatigue. One to three hours is the rough period of time you should be able to sustain in zone three.

Zone four – threshold
(91-105% FTP / 95-105% threshold HR / 80-90% MHR)
Zone four works on your anaerobic threshold. Therefore, the zone starts just below a rider’s anaerobic threshold and stretches to just above. This allows a rider to push up their anaerobic threshold using longer intervals and pull up their threshold by training using shorter intervals. Training in zone four produces a great deal of lactic acid and therefore zone four actually gives the greatest stimulus to increase the number of mitochondria in the muscles.

When to ride in zone four
Training in zone four is very fatiguing and therefore can only be done for limited periods. More often than not zone four training is done in intervals with a period of recovery between efforts. You should be able to maintain zone four for between ten minutes and one hour.

Zone five – VO2
(106-120% FTP / >106% threshold HR / 90-100% MHR)
This is the intensity you can hold for three to eight minutes. Training in zone five is very fatiguing and these are typically leg-burning efforts. In shorter efforts your heart rate may not have time to respond to the effort and your maximum heart rate may actually be after you’ve reached the top of a climb. This is the limit to which heart rate zones are usable as after this efforts will either be too short for heart rate to respond to, or you will simply reach your maximum heart rate. Training in this zone works on your cardiac output – how much and how quickly your heart can pump blood to where it is needed in the muscles.

When to ride in zone five
This is typically the zone you will be riding at when going as hard as you can up a small climb. A good example of this is the effort needed to climb the Koppenberg in the Tour of Flanders sportive.

I personally pick bits and pieces from this. I work a lot on trying to ride as efficiently as I could without going into the red (zone 4). When I did my first race I rode in zone 4 for for 5 hours and got cramps so I realised it wasn't the way to go. In winter my main concern is burning calories/fat. If I have the time for a longer ride (3-4 hours) I try to ride mostly in zone 2 but since everywhere I ride is hilly, I can't avpoid peaking into zone 3 on the climbs. If I only have time for a shorter ride (1-2 hours) I will do various intervals. In summer I do all kinds of rides, some mostly at the top of zone 3, peaking into zone 4 on climbs.

You can take a look at some training plans that are based on the HR zones + read more about the matter here: http://www.cyclingweekly.com/fitness/training/cycling-training-plans-153049

"Folks want options!"

Mon, 01/22/2018 - 14:01
NOVELTYNAME
NOVELTYNAME's picture

This is from an old Slovak pro. He’s like 55 and kills my buddy in Italy on vacation

"Folks want options!"

Mon, 01/22/2018 - 14:02
ergott
ergott's picture

I'm doing Zwift 10-12 week ftp builder. Started last week with 2nd week (said to skip 1st 2 weeks if in shape, I compromised).

So far feels good. Less weekly TSS than I've done in the past so I expect less chance of burnout in April/May. Also I think I can add in some group rides so long as they are of the LSD variety.

If someone on here did it, I'd probably like it. Since it was done by someone I don't know, they're a fucking idiot.

Mon, 01/22/2018 - 15:26
y
y's picture

meh, you’re better off not paying attention to heart rate.

Tue, 01/23/2018 - 12:26
yonderboy
yonderboy's picture

I've been using heart rate while on the MTB to analyze aerobic effort while not pedalling (downhill, flow, etc). That's one area that I think the current school of thought seems to ignore, because it is hard to measure. Even then, it's only for analysis; PE is used for gauging the effort.

Aerobic decoupling is another thing that I have been following over the years, but never really applied. The new beta of GC added that field to the activity summary, though.

Tue, 01/23/2018 - 13:59
yonderboy
yonderboy's picture
(Reply to #336)

I just finished up Week 12 of the British Cycling Foundation Plan. My first B+/A- race is mid-April, but I have one gravel grinder scheduled at the end of March. That should be enough to shake the dust off prior to the first enduro of the season. It's looking like I'll peak right around the end of May, just in time for the Hood River enduro. My fitness level feels a lot better than after 12 weeks of TCTP, but that is expected. I'm regularly doing 4 hr rides, which should serve me well through the later stages in the races. I've only added about 15 watts, but my weight is down 12 kg from peak fitness last season. The hills were where I was getting killed last year. I took about 300 cal off my daily intake through my base miles and it seems to have paid off with a w/kg of 2.8. I'm also coming off a week of norovirus, which should get me to my goal weight in another week or two.

I was running all my workouts through Xert for the last month. It seems to put my FTP right around 5% of what my tests are putting out. My TSS/wk is still around 330, but I'm now starting into my build. That average should climb a bit. It'll be interesting what happens over the next 12 weeks.

Sun, 02/11/2018 - 16:22

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